• Chamber Endorsements

  • THE CHAMBER ANNOUNCES ITS CANDIDATE ENDORSEMENTS FOR THE NOVEMBER ELECTIONS THE CHAMBER ANNOUNCES ITS CANDIDATE ENDORSEMENTS FOR THE NOVEMBER ELECTIONS

    The Monterey Peninsula Chamber announced thirteen candidate endorsements and five positions on local ballot measures and state propositions for the November 6, 2018 general election.  The Monterey Peninsula Chamber of Commerce (MPCC) takes political endorsements seriously. Our experienced Candidate Endorsement Committee reviews comprehensive candidate questionnaires and interviews all candidates at the same time for each individual elected position. The committee determines which candidate holds the strongest positions which align on issues important to Monterey Peninsula businesses.

  • CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA MAYOR - DAVE POTTER CARMEL-BY-THE-SEA MAYOR - DAVE POTTER

     Carmel-by-the-Sea Mayor – Dave Potter, a former Monterey County Supervisor, will be an asset to the City of Carmel-by-the-Sea with his significant public policy experience at the county and city levels of government, bi-partisan endorsement and a consistent record of support for small businesses.

     

  • DEL REY OAKS MAYOR - JERRY EDELEN DEL REY OAKS MAYOR - JERRY EDELEN

    Del Rey Oaks Mayor – incumbent Jerry Edelen continues to show strong and unwavering support for policies that promote economic growth, job creation, and fiscal responsibility in the City of Del Rey Oaks. He demonstrated instrumental leadership as a co-chair of the successful Measure X Campaign that is bringing $600 million dollars (which can be leveraged with state and federal funds) to Monterey County communities over the next 30 years to provide for much needed transportation improvements.

  • MARINA MAYOR - BOB NOLAN MARINA MAYOR - BOB NOLAN

    Marina Mayor – Bob Nolan – brings a pro-business perspective to the Marina City Council and to regional governments that need a new voice on their boards. He is a retired Marina police chief who served the city for decades and is well-known and well-respected in the community.

  • MONTEREY MAYOR - CLYDE ROBERSON MONTEREY MAYOR - CLYDE ROBERSON

    Monterey Mayor – Clyde Roberson – has demonstrated his skills in balancing the interests of businesses and residents, creating a collegial council environment and leading an effective City government with extensive municipal operations.

  • PACIFIC GROVE MAYOR - BILL PEAKE PACIFIC GROVE MAYOR - BILL PEAKE

    Pacific Grove Mayor – Bill Peake, a city council member in Pacific Grove, demonstrates a thorough analytical knowledge of the financial policies of the city and how they affect businesses. He served on the technical advisory committee for the Monterey Peninsula Water Supply Project and fully supports the need for a desal plant in the portfolio of projects.

  • SEASIDE MAYOR - IAN OGLESBY SEASIDE MAYOR - IAN OGLESBY

    Seaside Mayor – Ian Oglesby would bring experienced leadership as Mayor of Seaside and has a thorough understanding of the tenets of good government and fiscal responsibility. He supports economic development projects that will create prosperity for Seaside residents. He is also endorsed by current Mayor Ralph Rubio because of his reasonable nature and strong support for jobs for Seaside.

  • MONTEREY CITY COUNCILMEMBER - TIMOTHY BARRETT MONTEREY CITY COUNCILMEMBER - TIMOTHY BARRETT

     Monterey City Council Member – Timothy Barrett has shown a solid commitment to economic growth and small business development during his term on the Monterey City Council with his support for local preference policies and community capital initiatives to fund startup businesses. Councilman Barrett is a regular attendee and active participant at the Chamber’s monthly Economic Vitality and Government Affairs Committee meetings.

     

  • MONTEREY CITY COUNCILMEMBER - ED SMITH MONTEREY CITY COUNCILMEMBER - ED SMITH

    Monterey City Council Member – incumbent Ed Smith has remains active in his efforts to preserve neighborhood security, continue street repair, resolve traffic congestions, maintain fiscal responsibility, support public safety and parks and ensure a long-term regional water solution.  

  • SEASIDE CITY COUNCILMEMBER - REGINA MASON SEASIDE CITY COUNCILMEMBER - REGINA MASON

    Seaside City Council Member – Regina Mason understands the need for reasonable and responsible development in the City of Seaside. She showed exceptional commitment to the future of the Monterey Peninsula by attending and speaking at the recent California Public Utility Commission meeting at which the Monterey Peninsula Water Supply Project’s EIR/EIS was approved.

  • CALIFORNIA STATE SENATOR, DISTRICT 12 - ANNA CABALLERO CALIFORNIA STATE SENATOR, DISTRICT 12 - ANNA CABALLERO

    California State Senator, District 12 – Anna Caballero, a former Mayor of Salinas and current Assemblymember, has nurtured strong relationships with business leaders in Monterey County. She identifies herself as a “business Democrat” who aligns with other business Democrats, often working with Republicans, especially those from rural agricultural areas, on agriculture issues important to the prosperity of Monterey County.

  • MONTEREY PENINSULA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT DIRECTOR, DIVISION 1 - DEAN PROVENCE MONTEREY PENINSULA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT DIRECTOR, DIVISION 1 - DEAN PROVENCE

    Monterey Peninsula Water Management District Director, Division 1 – Dean Provence will bring experience and knowledge to the water board. He wants to solve the Peninsula’s water supply problems once and for all and knows that will require the critical desal plant component for a sustainable and drought proof water source. He supports water for lots of record and economic recovery for our businesses. Water supply projects were stalled when his opponent previously served as the MPWMD board chair.

  • MONTEREY PENINSULA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT DIRECTOR, DIVISION 2 - ANDREW "ANDY" CLARKE MONTEREY PENINSULA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT DIRECTOR, DIVISION 2 - ANDREW "ANDY" CLARKE

    Monterey Peninsula Water Management District Director, Division 2 – as the current chair of the MPWMD board, incumbent Andrew “Andy” Clarke has a track record of success with bringing new water supply projects online for the Peninsula: Pure Water Monterey ground water recycling project, Cal Am’s pipeline project (to convey the recycled water), and the recent approval of the Environmental Impact Report and state order to construct the desal project. He also brings his financial expertise as a controller for a Salinas-based water company. His opponent is a water activist who offers no immediate water supply solutions.

  • NO - MEASURE J NO - MEASURE J

     NO – Measure J would authorize the Monterey Peninsula Water Management District (MPWMD) to conduct a feasibility study (estimated to cost $500,000-$750,000) to purchase the Cal Am water delivery system and become a public owned utility. The Cal Am system is not for sale; and, if feasibility is determined, the community could be involved in years of litigation that would cost ratepayers millions of dollars. The proponents initially promised more affordable water, but they now are saying it could take 10-30 years for ratepayers to see lower rates and calling Measure J a “legacy” initiative for our children’s and grandchildren’s future. It appears the voters won’t have another chance to vote on the water system purchase; if MPWMD approves the feasibility, they say they’ll fund the water system purchase with financing that doesn’t require a public vote again.

    As Measure J Stokes the Debate Over Public Water, A Look at How Cal Am is Leading the Way -Jody Hansen, MPCC President and CEO

  • YES - MEASURE S YES - MEASURE S

    YES – Measure S is an extension of an existing one percent (1%) City of Monterey sales tax to fix streets, sidewalks and storm drains. Visitors contribute 40 percent towards the revenues. Measure S is not a tax increase; it’s an extension of the Street Infrastructure Rehabilitation tax passed in 2014, which was a 4-year tax measure. The proposed extension (Measure S) is for another 8 years (with a sunset), to help get the job finished. Most residents and businesses have seen positive improvement in the local road conditions that will save the City road maintenance costs in the long run. With funding from the existing tax, the City has: repaired 491 street segments (blocks), and an additional 49 street segments are currently under construction; made $1.6 million in sidewalk repairs; and made upgrades to 48 storm drain pipes that had been rated the worst in the system.

  • YES - PROPOSITION 1 YES - PROPOSITION 1

    YES – Proposition 1 – The $4 billion Veterans and Affordable Housing Act will help build affordable housing for veterans, working families, people with disabilities and Californian’s experiencing homelessness and develop the strong business environment we need. It’s expected to create 137,000 jobs statewide and pump $23.4 billion into California’s economy. Proposition 1 is not a total solution, but it is a start to address the widespread housing affordability crisis.

  • NO - PROPOSITION 6 NO - PROPOSITION 6

    NO – Proposition 6 – Repeal of the SB 1 Gas Tax – If the state gas tax is repealed under Proposition 6, Monterey County stands to lose $100-200 million in state funding, which will dramatically curtail its ability to leverage the $600 million in Measure X transportation funds over the next 30 years. Proposition 6 is bad for the economy, because over 6,500 local transportation projects relying on state funding will be halted, tens of thousands of jobs will be lost, and our transportation infrastructure will continue to deteriorate and pose safety risks due to deferred maintenance.

  • NO - PROPOSITION 10 NO - PROPOSITION 10

    NO – Proposition 10 – Repeal of the 1995 Costa-Hawkins Act and Expand Rent Control Authority in California – Repeal of the Costa Hawkins Act restricting Rent Control policies will have unintended consequences that will worsen the conditions that initiative supporters claim it will solve. Rental property owners, a majority of whom are small mom-and-pop operators, will sell or convert rental housing to condos, owner-occupied housing or tenancies-in-common. People who were not intended to be the beneficiaries of rent control, such as middle- and upper-class professionals, benefit the most; they stay for extended periods of time in the units, forcing low-income renters into higher-priced, distant housing, farther away from their jobs and schools. This initiative is bad for homeowners and renters and will make the housing crisis worse.